PaintPRO, Vol. 9, No. 5
September/October 2007
PaintPRO, Vol 9 No 5

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Other articles in this issue:
Painter of the Month
2008 Color Trends
Project Profile: Grasscloth
Product Profile: Speed Rollers
Business Strategies
Tools: Caulks and Caulking Tools
Finishing Touch: A Golden...
Paint Industry News
Product News

 
PaintPRO Archives

2008 Color Trends for Kitchens and Baths

Each year, as paint manufacturers assess their product offerings, they think about how recent events and influences will affect upcoming color trends and techniques in room design.
by Elizabeth Gillette

Companies pour these predictions into their new products for the upcoming year, and it’s these products that drive consumers’ color and technique options. As a successful paint contractor, it is important to know what products will be available in the near future, what trends are driving these colors, and what your customers should incorporate into their newly refurbished kitchens and baths.

We recently spoke with some of the leaders in the industry to gather information on what the new 2008 color trends for kitchens and baths and how they have evolved. Whether creating a worldly sense of travel and adventure in a room or providing a feeling of organic comfort through neutral backdrops, these colors will accentuate the effects you and your customers strive to achieve for their homes.

Benjamin-Moore: Home means comfort

The concept for Benjamin-Moore’s 2008 colors is Returning Home. “Home” in this context refers to a sense of comfort, and each of the three-color palettes described below represents comfort in a unique way.

Doty Horn, director of color and design for Benjamin-Moore, explains that the first color group, called Modern Tranquility, exudes comfort in the sense of calm or relaxation. The deepest state of relaxation can be felt in terms of levitation, and the colors in this group reflect this by being light and airy — pale, shimmering whites with colors such as pearl added. These include Wedding Veil, Latte and Capri Coast.


The second color group of 2008 Kitchen and Bath Color Trends is Organic Comforts, representing a return to one’s roots and the earth. The colors in this group are basic earthy colors: Sulfur Yellow, Everlasting, Providence Olive. Horn adds that it is necessary to acknowledge the mainstreaming of the environmental movement by incorporating this trend into design.




The third color group is Pure Opulence — opulent not in the sense of expensive, but in terms of rich colors that seem to come from deep within the earth’s core and are organic and pure. They are rich colors such as Aegean Teal, Cherokee Brick, French Violet and Cork.



Pantone: Vacation at home

Lisa Herbert, vice president of fashion and home at Pantone, says that kitchen and bath color trends for 2008 are being driven by the desire for a nurturing home environment and the desire to awaken the senses. �In the bath, color is inspired by the need for people to find a quiet respite and sanctuary to relax � to get away from craziness in life. The trend in bathrooms as of late is to build and remodel baths to be more spa-like by creating larger spaces that are painted in soothing colors.�

Pantone asserts that its Well-Spring home and interior palette will help create this spa-like feel. In its marketing materials, the company describes the palette as: �Universally understood as cleansing and clarifying and as the earth�s most precious commodity, water provides the wellspring that literally supports and sustains life. Blues and aquas clearly define the liquid�s cooling and more soothing qualities, highlighted by a glimmer of effervescent undersea green, violet and indigo. The undulating tones of mother of pearl and sandy shades of the shore bring a beautifully warming balance.�

For the kitchen, Herbert says color palettes are being defined by colors found throughout the world. �As more and more Americans travel to different regions of the world, they are being inspired by the places they see � sharing customs and cultures. The Agrestic palette from Pantone View home & interiors 2008 is an example of a rich, cultural color palette for the kitchen.�

While the Agrestic palette is rooted in rural origins, it reflects a culture of individually crafted materials that are aimed toward the upscale instead of being down-home, Herbert says. �It is appealingly contemporized country, a rustic redo of both textures and smooth surfaces that calls for comforting combinations of bruschetta browns, tender greens, or warming golden yellows with an unexpected accent of vibrant pink.�

 
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