Vol 5 No 6

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Other articles in this issue:
Full Body Stains
Special Effects with Epoxies
Faux Applications
Bleaches & Conditioners
Estimating, Etc.
School: Atlanta School of Fine Finishes
Paint Industry News
Product News
Product Profiles
Painting Tips

 

 
PaintPRO Archives
pg 1 of 3

Faux Effects Techniques

PaintPRO magazine recognizes that consumers want finishes that are both decorative and unique to their style of living. Just as commercial/ industrial contractor Soep Painting (this issue's Painter of the Month) has incorporated decorative finishes into its portfolio of services, any contractor, whether large or small, can learn new skills that will make his or her company stand out from the rest.

PaintPRO magazine recognizes that consumers want finishes that are both decorative and unique to their style of living. Just as commercial/ industrial contractor Soep Painting (this issueÍs Painter of the Month) has incorporated decorative finishes into its portfolio of services, any contractor, whether large or small, can learn new skills that will make his or her company stand out from the rest.

Schools around the country offer training in faux and decorative finishes of all types. Taking a few classes will give you the foundation you need to be proficient at this rewarding and profitable segment of the industry. In the meantime, try a couple of these application techniques on a sample board or in your own living room, and discover the artist within!

•Muted Metallic Finish
Contributed by Donna Mabrey, owner of Donna’s Designs, Inc., located in the Atlanta, Georgia., area.

Muted Metallic Finish is a finish that gives a non-directional, wispy glazed look to a surface. The metallic basecoat makes a beautiful effect even though it is totally fauxed over with glaze. Some benefits to this particular finish are that it doesn’t require a wet edge, nor does it need any special tools or product line. There are, however, some keys to this easy technique that will ensure the best results, so be sure and check the “hints” sidebar before starting.

Materials required:

Spray bottle for a fine mist
Three-inch paper tape (for corner)
Two-inch masking tape (for trim)
1 pint propylene glycol or extender
Two large natural sponges
1 quart Golden’s satin glaze (or any brand water-based glaze)
Apron with pockets
One squeeze bottle
One quart latex black semi-gloss paint
Basecoat any sheen (we used Duron #8683w)
1 pint Golden’s brand Silver metallic (or any brand)
1 pint Golden’s brand Gold metallic (or any brand)

Topcoat mixture

  • 1 part paint
  • 3 parts glaze
  • 1 part extender (propylene glycol)

Step 1
Tape off all trim. Apply one coat of a taupe colored paint, any sheen. After it dries, apply two coats of metallic paint rolled on with a nap roller. Let it dry between coats. Don’t worry about roller marks, they won’t show through the faux finish. I make my own “pewter” glaze color by combining one part gold and one part silver equally. You work only one wall at a time using 3-inch tape to protect the adjacent walls.

Step 2
Muted metallic is a two-handed finish. That’s why an apron is needed to hold your squeeze bottle of the topcoat. Both sponges must be moistened thoroughly, and then wrung out. As with most finishes, use the flat side of the sponge, not the prickly side. Squeeze the topcoat onto a sponge, and then dab onto the wall. Being right-handed, I apply the topcoat with my left (weak) hand. How you dab on the topcoat is irrelevant. Then, with my right (strong) hand, I soften (pressing through the glaze and swish) the color until all the dabbed topcoat is completely worked. (photo #1). Work your way diagonally across the segment. Now, here’s the important hint: leave the edge uneven (as in Photo #2) and work in diagonal segments (see diagram). You’ll be able to work about one, one-by-two foot area at a time. This finish goes quickly, and there’s no need to maintain a wet edge.

Step 3
To create a new segment, apply some new topcoat with the weak hand, two to four inches away from the previously softened edge. (Photo #2) It can be dry. Then pat with your strong hand into the wet topcoat and soften to the previous edge without heavily overlapping. (If there is a slight overlap, it will appear as a drift and still look attractive.) Then finish softening with your strong hand, until a new segment is created. This is a sheer finish with no heavy overlap lines.

Step 4
Work your way across the wall (again, see diagram). Corners are easy. Tape off with the three inch paper. Dab and soften the topcoat right into the corner. Do opposite walls, and then do opposite walls again. AC, BD. The great thing about this finish is that you can start and stop anywhere, as long as the area is softened and left in a diagonal segment before you quit.

For more information, contact Donna at 888/92-DONNA, or visit her Web site.

 
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